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Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Giving for gardening goodies!

Giving for Gardening Goodies

As Spring rolled into town, daddy prepared the hard, crusty garden surface by getting the local farmer (Mr. Lapp) to come in with his large gray tractor and disc up the plot of earth from one side of the half acre to the other.  All of this done in no more than 10 minutes with the size of the tractor he used...

After the discing took place, the next step was tillering. Daddy would fire up the tiller, and walk it back to the garden.  We were well aware that the droning sound of that machine meant, "Get in line and start picking those rocks!"  On certain occasions, me and the boys were known to seek out hiding places in the house to avoid the scene in the backyard at all costs.  Our friends would make such fun out of having to pick rocks!  

With much dragging and threatening, we'd walk behind the tiller, Dad, Mom, Skip, Me, and Mike carrying buckets, picking rocks.  Consequently, the roots of the young plants could be spoiled with the pleasure of stretching themselves into the soft, brown, luxurious soil! We were the only garden workers on the block!  We filled bucket after bucket with rocks...the rockiest piece of the planet had to be the plot at 1470!

Next,the planting would begin...Just as methodical as possible, the young plants would go into the ground.  One of us dug, one sprinkled fertilizer, and one watered. Who ever went last covered the seeds or the young plants with the smooth blanket of tilled soil.  

Then we waited and waited until the weeds began to take over the lay of the land.  Weeding meant more work...especially after a gentle rain, we'd all be found with our buckets again, this time filling them with weeds.

At this point, we'd wonder why were we doing all of this work?  U n t i l, low and behold, the veggies finally started coming in-bib lettuce, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes, green peppers, corn, onions, and radishes-all like a giant salad just waiting to be prepared! And then the pay-off, finally getting to sample the tasty treats, garden goodies-nature's pay for all the work. By this time in the summer, mom would begin to freeze or can the veggies so we would have plenty of food for the winter...preparing for the future.

At an early age, I gained access to the rules of this game.  I learned that planning, preparation and persistence prequalify for the pay-off in the end!  The lesson has carried over to life in so many ways!  Thanks for teaching me the value of hard work Dad and Mom-giving for gardening goodies!

22 comments:

  1. I like how you write in a positive tone about the gardening. When I think back to the rock picking and weeding in the childhood it seemed endless and moan worthy work. I am glad that the garden is smaller nowadays and my sister takes care most of it.

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    1. We have tiniest of gardens at our house now, but this year, I decided no to plant anything...

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  2. I guess we all CAN find goodness in the "produce" we grow if we think about it in the "right way." It's hard to grow too much where we live these days as the deer eat it all. SO, we use Community Supported Agriculture fams where we PAY someone to do the rocks and "tillering" for us. We still get to enjoy the bounty! You post reminds me that we do miss something when we do not put our hands in the dirt.

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    1. Great poin about missing something when we can't put our hands in the dirt. Part of our Earth
      Y spirit right?

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  3. Fun to read! I spent the evening helping my daughter build her garden and flower beds. She has moved into an old house and is now working with care, hard work and time to make it a home just as you did with your family. Some traditions live on!

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    1. Gardening in such hard work, but the rewards from the work are so great! I agree, traditions do live on!

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  4. As a child, you don't appreciate the task of gardening, it just another onerous chore. Now as an adult, you reap what your parents sowed many years ago. Nice slice for today.

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    1. Thanks Elsie! You are right-appreciation is not realized until you've grown in to yourself...

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  5. I am always in awe of people who love gardening! I only have the endurance/patience for it in small amounts. But I can understand the memories that I tied to our experiences.Your story reminded my about my childhood summers on the hay field....Thanks for the memories.

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    1. Yes, enduring only so much at a time ...I am not urge how my dad did all he did, with working full time too. I think the idea that he needed to put food on the table for his family was probably the strongest motivation.

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  6. Wonderful slice - brings back memories of planting our garden and wishing we had good enough soil to start a garden here. Yes, lots of work, but the rewards are all worth the effort. Thanks for sharing.

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  7. Sounds like you learbned a liot from your parents! Lovely post of growing up!

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    1. With each passing year, I realize more and more how much I learned from them, especially with child of my own now!

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  8. I'm just down to planting pumpkins & the squirrels at them last year, but I've learned persistence too, Amy, so I will try again. This is a marvelous memory with a sweet lesson, & tribute to your parents, at the end. I remember so well the gardens of my grandparents. I helped a little, but mostly ate the good rewards at the end. Thanks for the memories!

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    1. Thanks Linda! Good luck with the pumpkins this year! I think the squirrels are getting out of control! They are crazy little beasts!

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  9. These are good remembrances of gardening, and also of your family working together, too. Good lessons in both. Thanks!

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  10. Love this! Very evocative descriptions, and a good reminder that hard work bears fruit (or veggies)

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  11. Cute play on words Maria! Thanks for your compliment too!
    Amy

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  12. Your statement about planning, preparation and persistence was a lesson my parents worked hard to teach me too - just not in the dirt - they didn't like to garden and I didn't "catch" that green thumb either. But I really really really appreciate the gifts of those of you who do.

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    1. Thanks,all those "p" words! It's amazing how we pick up our parents habits and learn from what they teach us...sorry you didn't catch the green thumb!

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