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Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Trying Something New-Learning to use a Spoon










 

New Learning and Eating with a Spoon

This slice, inspired by 2 things really: a posted picture on Facebook that said, “Everything you were looking for was right there with you all along”—from the Wizard of Oz…


 

And


 

Watching Natalie learning to eat with a spoon…



So here’s what I learned (Notes to self~I really could apply this to anything I’m learning new-just by observing her-oh those little observations)
 

1.    Try it, "nothing ventured nothing gained"-she just grabbed the spoon and went for the applesauce!

2.   It’s okay to be messy!  REALLY!  Being messy is part of the learning-things can’t and most often won’t be perfect! She had applesauce on her chin, her shirt, and the table.  I have to say, “It’s ok”.  

3.   I must take new learning in smaller chunks-larger bites most likely cause choking and are just too hard to make learning useful!-she took the applesauce in smaller bites and was able to get more in her mouth than when dropping the larger amount it on its way there.

 

4.   Sometimes a helping hand is needed and it’s ok to let go of support-I was trying to feed her myself to guide the spoon in with the applesauce on it and suddenly she just started telling me “No” “No” “No”-I took this as a sign to hand it off to her and she did get the food in without my help!

5.   Maybe, things just taste better when the work is accomplished without help!  She smiled so happily when she was able to get the spoon to her mouth without my assistance, all by herself!

6.   And finally sometimes finishing isn't possible, it’s ok not to finish everything todayleave a little on the plate for another day!  She didn’t eat all of the applesauce or the whole muffin, and that’s ok!

Everything I needed to know was right there next to me all along!

21 comments:

  1. Really such a great comparison and I love the pictures. I just remember the messiness of it all and that is so, so true in writing. Have fun Amy, xo nanc

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    1. Thanks Nanc! Sometimes, messes just make for more fun right?

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  2. A lot of these lessons ring true when I think about some of the things we've been trying with Teachers Write. What a fun and creative way to share lessons about new learning.

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    1. Thanks Dana! Yes, I was thinking a lot about the new things I have been doing with Teachers Write!

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  3. Love this! I also wrote today about things I learned about life (well, mostly about writing) while building a small bistro set. It's funny how when our writer's eye is open we see these things everywhere!

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    1. Yes, noticing more details with everything!

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  4. This is great! I always hesitate handing over the keys to the car (i.e., the spoon and fork) to Isabelle for fear of what will happen. Inevitably it's always messy, but there's so much that can be learned from the experience.

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  5. So what happens on the way that we forget these lessons? Why are we as adults so afraid to try or to be messy? It is certainly good to have children to remind us how to learn.

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    1. I think our culture promotes perfectionism...the media has so much fun with people who make "mistakes" that people become scared to take a risk...fear making mistakes and no risk will be taken! We need to follow Yoda's advice-try not! Do!

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  6. I love when connections like these can be made. It's so true! A life lesson is, well, a life lesson no matter the situation! My favorite? #2! It's okay to be messy. (I'm thinking about the writing process. It can be such a mess of disaster, but in the end something great can be crafted!) And Terje asks a great question: What happens along the way that we forget these lessons?

    Great learning and advice shared - thanks to Natalie and Mom's observations!

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    1. Thinking more about the "messy" part reminded me of Annemarie Johnson's post titled A Hot Mess
      She shared that another teacher told her students, "the rough draft isn't Finished unless it looks like a " hot mess". ;)

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  7. I agree with Terje - why are we afraid to be messy? My grandchildren have taught me that it's okay to "me do". It may take a little longer and it may be messy, but how else will they learn. Thanks for your gentle reminder that "being a little messy" will help each of us to continue to grown.

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    1. Messes do seem to help us grow and taking longer requires more patience!

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  8. Loved that last line...and all that went before it to make the lesson "stick"!

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  9. This comparison works absolutely perfectly! I love"learning is messy." I also love that Natalie knew when she was ready to do it on her own. Sometimes that letting go is hardest for me as a teacher (and a mom!). Thanks so much for this great analogy!

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    1. I so agree the letting go is hard...scaffolding versus rescuing another part of the learning curve...

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  10. I too love all the connections here. I related closely to: too much on the spoon and not getting as much applesauce. It is like when I am teaching writing (anything really, as you pointed out) it is better when I deliver a little learning, it is likely to make it in. Too much to learn, too much in the mini-lesson (not so mini) and it is likely that not as much will make it in and get digested. Love it Amy, what great things to ponder.

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    1. I like your connection to the "mini" lesson! Great application! I. Absolutely agree with you!

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  11. Great reminders of the learning process. It was nice the way you listed your observations and the application. I am taking your observations to heart.

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